Picture Book Review: Elisha: a Man of Gentleness and Self-Control by Rediesha C. Allen

Elisha: A Man of Gentleness and Self-Control written by Redeisha C. Allen, illustrated by Hatice Bayramoglu

A watercolor leaf background with tan and pale greens. On it is a stack of three books, the top one is a muted teal square hardback. On the cover is a brown skinned kneeing boy in a white top with a red sash and blue shawl. Behind him are several other brown skinned people in Biblical dress. The title arcs across the top “Elisha: A Man of Gentleness and Self Control”. In the corners are gold filigrees.
Image description: A watercolor leaf background with tan and pale greens. On it is a stack of three books, the top one is a muted teal square hardback. On the cover is a brown skinned kneeing boy in a white top with a red sash and blue shawl. Behind him are several other brown skinned people in Biblical dress. The title arcs across the top “Elisha: A Man of Gentleness and Self Control”. In the corners are gold filigrees.

Book description: Journey with Melanin Origins as we share a short story about a mighty man of God named Elisha, and how his life lines up with the Fruits of the Spirit: Gentleness and Self-Control. Meekness may be defined as, “strength under control”, but when one knows he possesses great abilities within– it takes a dose of gentleness and self-control to rightly direct one’s efforts for the glory of God.

Elisha is the next book in the All in All series that shows the lives of Biblical prophets. This reads like a lot of the traditional saint stories detailing the early life of Elisha, his call to God, and his miracles. This is a great starting point for young readers, parents, and educators wanting to introduce these important religious figures.

But the series elevates the simple biographical format by incorporating a characteristic or skill that children can develop with practice and a role model demonstrating what it looks like. Here Elisha represents thoughtfulness and, as the title says, self control. Oh, self control. Such a hard skill for children and adults alike. Elisha takes his time thinking about questions he’s been asked and problems he’s been called upon to help solve. He prays, thinks, and then offers advice. While children won’t read this once and master thoughtful action and answers, they can easily grasp the concept which is gently presented here. And while many people worry about books that moralize to children or contain a Message (capital M), Allen has done a pitch perfect job balancing being clear about what Elisha represents and not preaching in an insulting and too-obvious way. Elisha is clearly someone to emulate, not someone who can be held over the heads of kids who sometimes (or frequently) act impulsively.

Illustrator Hatice Bayramoglu depicts Elisha, and even Elijah, as young boys following the tradition of Melanin Origins’ Snippet of the Life series. I wrote in my very first review of one of those books that I was surprised how it made the person and subject more relatable for my own daughter. Kids like to see themselves in stories and having famous figures shown as children gives them an entre.

This whole series is recommended for churches, Sunday schools, religious homeschoolers, parochial schools, and families looking to feature religious figures at home. Libraries also serve all of these populations and I would recommend they purchase these as well, especially for homeschooling families who frequently use libraries.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links). Please, in this uncertain time, if at all possible, purchase from an independent/local bookstore. They need our help right now.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

Picture Book Review: The Faithfulness of Daniel by Jalissa B. Pollard

A watercolor leaf background with tan and pale greens. On it is a stack of three books, the top one is a brown square hardback. On the cover is a light skinned smiling boy in a blue top. The title arcs across the top “The Faithfulness of Daniel”. In the corners are gold filigrees.

The Faithfulness of Daniel written by Jalissa B. Pollard, illustrated by Adua Hernandez

A watercolor leaf background with tan and pale greens. On it is a stack of three books, the top one is a brown square hardback. On the cover is a light skinned smiling boy in a blue top. The title arcs across the top “The Faithfulness of Daniel”. In the corners are gold filigrees.
Image description: A watercolor leaf background with tan and pale greens. On it is a stack of three books, the top one is a brown square hardback. On the cover is a light skinned smiling boy in a blue top. The title arcs across the top “The Faithfulness of Daniel”. In the corners are gold filigrees.

Book description: Journey with Melanin Origins as we share a short story about Daniel and how his life lines up with the Fruit of the Spirit: Faithfulness. Faith and dedication to doing God’s will were key ingredients to the “excellent spirit” that Daniel possessed.

Another standout in the All in All Series from Melanin Origins. Daniel distills the Biblical story of Daniel down for young audiences. Pollard, author of My Grandmother is a Lady, has hit all the right notes; good vocabulary words without over complicating the text, a simple story that still retains the essence, and a clear message that is understandable for the intended audience.

This story feels particularly apt at a time when the world feels scary, even, or especially, to children. Daniel, a wise man, kept his faith despite being tested and ultimately faced a literal den of lions for it. But it was also his faith that saved him. God delivers him from the lions keeping their mouths shut while Daniel was in the den. An exciting story on the outside, but it also points to the importance of putting your faith in God or in something that is bigger than yourself when you feel powerless and frightened. A letting go of the things you can’t control. The book does use religious terms and is, obviously, taken directly from the Bible, but even non-religious/spiritual families can find the message here encouraging.

As always Adua Hernandez has illustrated the story perfectly. Daniel is shown as a young boy making it easy for children to relate. The sets are peopled with the right amount of people and details to make the pictures inviting, but not overly cluttered. All of the books in the series depict the Biblical figures as Black or brown and not the traditionally inaccurate blond haired and blue eyed figures.

This series, and this book, is perfect for families, Sunday schools, parochial preschools and kindergartens. Homeschooling families looking for Biblical additions to their curriculum would also benefit from having these. Libraries too that serve any of these populations should consider them for their collections.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links). Please, in this uncertain time, if at all possible, purchase from an independent/local bookstore. They need our help right now.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

Picture book Review: Abraham’s Great Love by Louie T. McClain II

Image description: A watercolor leaf background with tan and pale greens. On it is a blue square paperback book. On the cover is a group of people in biblical robes. In the foreground is a boy with brown skin and dreadlocks. He is looking out at the reader smiling. The title arcs across the top “Abraham’s Great Love”. In the corners are gold filigrees.

Abraham’s Great Love written by Louie T. McClain II, illustrated by Xander A. Nesbitt

Book description: Journey with Melanin Origins as we share a short story about Abraham, the “Father of Many Nations”, and how his life lines up with the Fruit of the Spirit: Love. As a believer dedicated to doing God’s Will, Abraham lived a life that demonstrated love for all mankind.

Melanin Origins has launched a new series, the All In All Series, focusing on figures from the Old Testament. Faith communities take note, these sweet little books are going to be perfect for families, Sunday school, children’s chapel, and holidays.

The first in the series is Abraham. The story follows Abraham through key points in his life while focusing primarily on the overarching theme of his story. These books are perfect for their advertised audience, second grade and below. They feature bright illustrations with big-eyed people. Each page has a short sentence or two which will keep kids engaged through the story. And they don’t get bogged down in scripture, old-fashioned language, or the strange minutiae that can sometimes happen in the Bible.

The book also strikes a balance between telling Abraham’s biographical story and focusing on the message of his story. As you could probably tell from the title, love is the theme here, and even for someone like me who is not religious I can’t help but feel this message is an important one for children, especially in this time. Kids need to feel loved and they need to be taught to love. Moreover, the story demonstrates how love guided Abraham- through difficulty, in relationships with people and the Earth, and in faith. Abraham uses love to guide his decisions in putting others first and how he approaches God.

The illustrations are especially exciting. The people are adorable and very inviting with large cartoon eyes and big faces. Kids will be drawn to them. Many religious books depict characters of the Bible as blonde haired and blue eyed, not exactly culturally or historically accurate to say the least. Here we see a cast of characters that have a variety of brown skin tones and differing hair colors and textures (including the loc’d Abraham). Not only will these illustrations feel more relevant than the typical Biblical illustrations, but they’re more accurate too.

For all you non-religious families, I have a pet theory that Biblical references are everywhere in our culture and to be fully culturally literate it helps to know a little something about the major monotheistic religions and the stories of the Bible. If you don’t know Noah, you won’t understand when someone makes a remark about going two-by-two or building an arc. It’s maybe not totally necessary, but you would be surprised how often these images and references appear if you actually pay attention. If you want a fun way to introduce these stories to your children so they have a general frame of reference, these would be a way to get started.

Abraham, and the rest of the series, is highly recommended for churches, religious schools and preschools, and families alike. Libraries should seriously consider carrying them for their religious families and Christian homeschoolers.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links). Please, in this uncertain time, if at all possible, purchase from an independent/local bookstore. They need our help right now.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

Picture Book Review: Being Different Is the Name of the Game by MeMe Taylor Davis

Five friends stand on a hill of green grass. The sun shines above them. There is an alligator, a female lion, a cat wearing a fruit hat, a monkey wearing large purple glasses, and a blue dinosaur. They all wave at the reader and are smiling.
Image description: Five friends stand on a hill of green grass. The sun shines above them. There is an alligator, a female lion, a cat wearing a fruit hat, a monkey wearing large purple glasses, and a blue dinosaur. They all wave at the reader and are smiling.

Being Different Is the Name of the Game by MeMe Taylor Davis, illustrated by Jorge Mansilla

From Goodreads: Being Different is the Name of the Game is story for children to identify differences in the animals. Read along as each character embraces their uniqueness and creates a community of friendship, acceptance, and a celebration of distinct qualities.

In addition to publishing a series of books geared towards supporting Black children, Melanin Origins has a series of books that are excellent for building empathy, respect, and social-emotional intelligence in children. Being Different is the latest in this (informal) series of books.

This will be hard for children to resist with bright, friendly colors and adorable animal kids on the cover. Right off the bat the book is hitting the right notes. Simple, snappy, rhyming text introduces each character making this a perfect read aloud for preschool and kindergarten age kiddos.

Each animal has something about them that makes them different from other animals like themselves. A blue dinosaur, a kind lion, long alligator ears, and even glasses.

The glasses is especially interesting. There are a handful of books that address children needing to wear glasses with the intent of normalizing it and introducing the idea to their peers. Certainly those books are worth reading, but the fact that glasses wearing is integrated into a number of other differences positions it in a larger context of diversity along with skin color, temperament, and physical appearance.

I know books that tackle diversity often use animals as a proxy for humans. That gets criticized for not being more explicit and while that is a valid argument, I think it can veer into the territory of wanting one perfect book to present diversity and discrimination to children. A one-and-done type resource. The reality is children need a host of resources that can act as entry points into lots of discussions about diversity and oppression. As with the books about glasses, this is a great book to have on shelves with other books that open conversations about difference. Pair it with The People You May See for a robust discussion about being respectful and accepting of human variety.

Schools with SEL curriculum and parents looking to up their kids acceptance of diversity should have this on their shelves. Kids will love the illustrations and positive message. I suspect it will be a favorite, read again and again. And again.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links)

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

Picture Book Review: Beautiful Black Girl by Keshia Johnson

A pink background with large script-like letters along the top that spell out the title Beautiful Black Girl. Below a little girl with brown skin and black hair up in two puffs has her hand on her hip. She is turned slightly and is looking sideways at herself in a mirror. She wears a sparkly yellow dress and two white bows in her hair.
Image description: A pink background with large script-like letters along the top that spell out the title Beautiful Black Girl. Below a little girl with brown skin and black hair up in two puffs has her hand on her hip. She is turned slightly and is looking sideways at herself in a mirror. She wears a sparkly yellow dress and two white bows in her hair.

Beautiful Black Girl written by Keshia Johnson, illustrated by Mark Mas Stewart

From Goodreads: Read along as renowned author, Keshia Johnson of Beautiful Black Girl, tells the story of a young girl Mila, whose grandmother Molly takes her on a journey of falling in love with her beautiful black skin. The story of Mila’s journey to self-love inspires and encourages black girls everywhere to embrace who they are and conquer the world.

Melanin Origins publishes a line of books designed to bolster the self esteem of Black children, and especially Black girls. These books are necessary and it is amazing that Melanin Origins continues to bring them into the world. Beautiful Black Girl joins the ranks with Penelope Embraces Her Uniqueness, Perfect As I Am, and I Love My Mocha Skin.

If for no other reason, Beautiful Black Girl should be on library shelves to tell Black girls they are beautiful, capable, and worthy. This message feels even more urgent in the current time with the pandemic and kids being out of their routines and elements. Morale is low, kids are struggling. Getting some extra love and encouragement to wrap around them and reminding them that they are loved is crucial right now.

This also works as an anti-bullying book. Mila comes home from school feeling sad because the kids made fun of her hair and lips and also her desire to be a doctor when she grows up. This is the beauty of picture books- they are meant to be a shared reading experience and allow for discussion about the illustrations, the story, and/or the messages within the story. If used as a read aloud in classrooms or libraries this first scene can open up discussion about how these comments made Mila feel, what the children could have said instead, how to care for yourself when someone says something hurtful, and what a bystander could have done if they over heard these hurtful comments. Sometimes young children are curious and helping them learn to rephrase their questions or who might be a more appropriate person to ask questions of is an important skill they need guidance with as is the skill of not saying everything that pops into your head and putting yourself in someone else’s shoes to understand how comments can hurt feelings even if that wasn’t the intent.

One of the aspects of this book I love the most about is that the focus is not just on Mila’s appearance. Her grandmother encourages her to dream big and not let the narrow minds of her classmates hinder what she sees herself as capable of accomplishing. I know a lot of Black children, and especially girls, are teased for their appearance- skin that is “too dark”, hair that is “too natural”, etc. – and it is critically important that adults explicitly counter those messages and call out the anti-blackness of them. But girls also need messages beyond their appearance, because they are more than their bodies. Mila wants to be a doctor when she grows up and her grandmother pushes her to keep that dream and elaborate on it.

Finally Mila takes the book out to her friends at the end to encourage them and boost their spirits as well. The model of sharing the love with those you care about is also a critically important skill for kids to witness and internalize. The illustrations here, as with all Melanin Origin books are adorable. Keisha has endearing hair puffs and big, sweet eyes.

I also want to use this as a reminder to adults not to put your own ideas about this book onto children. It is written for Black girls and that by itself is perfect. But even if you have an all white patron base at your library (this should concern you, by the way!), you never know what child will connect with the message. I have seen my own daughter, who is so pale she looks blue, pick up these books in Melanin Origins’ catalog and love them and get a boost from them. I’m not saying kids are colorblind, but kids don’t always need the trappings of race to connect with a book and adults should be mindful of this when offering them books on the library shelves.

All in all, a great addition to the books that support Black girls. There are a lot of possibilities for this book in the hands of parents and educators. It would be perfect for kindergarten, first, and even second grade discussion and reading.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

Picture Book Review: Penelope Embraces Her Uniqueness by Katrina Hunt

Penelope Embraces Her Uniqueness written by Katrina Hunt, illustrated by Adua Hernandez

A purple book cover features a little girl with two hair poofs. She has her eyes closed and her arms wrapped around herself. She is wearing a bright yellow, sleeveless dress. She is being encircled by glowing musical notes. In the background is a baby grand piano.
Image description: A purple book cover features a little girl with two hair poofs. She has her eyes closed and her arms wrapped around herself. She is wearing a bright yellow, sleeveless dress. She is being encircled by glowing musical notes. In the background is a baby grand piano.

From Goodreads: Read along as author, Katrina Hunt, tells the story of a young girl named Penelope who has some struggles embracing all of the things that make her special/unique. Penelope eventually realizes that life is so much more than how she looks, but it’s her wonderful gifts and talents that make her one of a kind, too. Penelope Embraces Her Uniqueness inspires and encourages children to embrace who they are, and let their uniqueness shine through.

Penelope is having a hard time feeling like she’s different from everyone around her. She’s focused on how she looks different- her feet aren’t dainty, her skin is darker than the other girls, her hair is poofy. But one night she visits a fair and starts dancing at the music tent. She’s invited up on stage and discovers she is good at something. All the body criticism falls away and she realizes that it’s okay to be different and that she has had this talent and inner strength all along.

I think these types of books are especially wonderful in school and classroom libraries where there are groups of children who may end up comparing themselves to each other. This is something Penelope struggles with in the story. Not to mention the trend of working with children on their social and emotional intelligences in those venues. Penelope encourages children to find their gifts and talents and the special things that make them them.

I also think that, while every child can benefit from the positive message here, Black children (and a lot of children of color more broadly) will especially benefit from seeing a little girl who looks like them on the page. Traditional publishing still overwhelmingly centers white characters and this is true for those books that show quirky kids being accepted as they are. Librarians who serve populations with kids of color and Black children should be sure to have this on their shelves, especially if they also have books like Madeline, Lady Bug Girl, and Pippi Longstocking.

Adua Hernandez is always a strong illustrator. Her people are adorable and so much of her art features bright, friendly colors and patterns. It’s part manga, part cartoon. Penelope is hard on herself for her looks, but in reality she’s a sweet little girl with her hair in poofs, big brown eyes, and a yellow dress that pops against her brown skin. She also looks a lot like the author’s daughter who can be seen on the dedication page. As always the colors are bright and inviting and draw the reader into the page.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links)

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

Picture Book Review: Hermanito: Little Brother and Hermanita: Little Sister by Dr. Khalid White & Isela Garcia White

Hermanito: Little Brother written by Dr. Khalid White & Isela Garcia White, illustrated by Adua Hernandez

Hermanita: Little Sister written by Dr. Khalid White & Isela Garcia White, illustrated by Adua Hernandez

Cover of the book features a light yellow background with the title across the top. In the center is a pink and purple rug with the three siblings sitting on it.
Image description: Cover of the book features a light yellow background with the title across the top. In the center is a pink and purple rug with the three siblings sitting on it.

From Goodreads: Read along as Mateo and Amaya laugh, share, and play with their little brother, Santiago. Hermanito teaches children the values of teamwork, responsibility and love in an environment filled with positive imagery from a lovely Afro-Latinx family. The story is told in both English and in Spanish for bilingual readers and language learners.

From Goodreads: Read along as Ximena and Miguel laugh, share and play with their little sister, Ariana. While in play, the older siblings show Ariana the values of teamwork, responsibility and love as only a family can. The story is told in both English and in Spanish for bilingual readers and language learners.

I’m reviewing these two books together because they are written in the tradition of books like What Mommies Do Best/What Daddies Do Best by Laura Numeroff, The Brother Book/The Sister Book by Todd Parr, and various potty training books geared toward boys or girls, as you might be able to tell from the titles here. Depending on what sibling order you have in your family, you could choose either title.

A light pink cover features three siblings with various shades of brown skin sit on a brightly striped rug. On the baby's lap is an open book.
Image description: A light pink cover features three siblings with various shades of brown skin sit on a brightly striped rug. On the baby’s lap is an open book.

The illustrations in both books are superb. Hernandez has a knack for creating adorable children and in these two books we get a gaggle of them. She also always uses bright, friendly colors, textures, and settings that make her books very inviting especially to children.

The families appear to be mixed Latinx/Black families. They also have a range of skin tones including some darker skinned people (the mix is different in each book). It’s not common to see mixed families except when the book is specifically talking about diversity and usually the mixed family is Black and White. Of course there are Black folks who are also Latinx and these books could easily be representing them too. And of course there are Black families that are not mixed who have a variety of skin tones and again this book could be reflecting them, although there are a few details that make it seem more like the families have some Latinx roots.

I absolutely love that in each home there is a small alter for the Virgin Mary with candles and flowers. It’s just a small detail and the homes for the most part look very American (if suspiciously clean for having three kids in them!), but this is the type of detail that can mean the world to children who are seeing their homes and family traditions reflected on the page.

The story in each book is split into two sections, the first shows the parents making a meal for the family and, once seated at the table, they talk about how they expect the older siblings to show the youngest how to be responsible and take personal responsibility. The second half shows the siblings doing exactly this. They talk about helping out around the house, taking care of pets, and playing. I appreciate that there are a mix of activities for both the brother and sister that show them being active and helping around the house. This second portion of the text is done is a sing-song type of verse which make it easy for young readers to join in and read or repeat along:

“Little Sister, Little Sister. We love to make you dance. Little Sister. Little Sister. Go put on some pants!”

“Little Brother. Little Brother. Let’s all play with the ball. Little Brother. Little Brother. We won’t let you fall.”

These would make great books for older siblings to share with their pre- and emerging reader younger sibs. They could skip the first part if the child they are reading to is young and may not sit through the whole story.

The books are also translated into Spanish (another reason I think the family has some Latinx roots). If you are a librarian in a bilingual school either because your population speaks Spanish or because you are an emersion school, these would make great additions to your collection.

The end of each book has some blank pages with questions on them for readers to answer, such as what do you like to do with your family and how might you help them. I love when books have these spaces to have kids personalize the stories and really think about the ideas. I really appreciate that the author has asked children to write OR draw to answer the questions- a very important distinction to make for kids who might not yet be writing.

All in all, both of these are sweet books that would be wonderful additions to collections with other sibling books on the shelves (including home libraries).

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links)

Hermanito:

Hermanita:

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

Picture Book Review: Testing Jitters by Alisha Chenevert

Testing Jitters written by Alisha Chenevert, illustrated by Hatice Bayramoglu

On the cover of the picture book is a classroom. A variety of children are sitting at desks with papers in front of them and pencils in hand. In the center of the picture is a girl with braided pigtails, a bright pink shirt, and brown skin.
Image descritpion: On the cover of the picture book is a classroom. A variety of children are sitting at desks with papers in front of them and pencils in hand. In the center of the picture is a girl with braided pigtails, a bright pink shirt, and brown skin.

From Goodreads: Read along as a brilliant young lady by the name of Mya shares her struggles of testing anxiety. As Mya prepares for bed the night before a big test, she finds herself unable to fall asleep. Suddenly, a genie appears to grant her ten wishes which includes a journey through some of Mya’s favorite adventures. Throughout her journey, Mya learns to focus on positive thoughts that bring her joy and help her to relax as she prepares for a test. She awakes to find that she no longer has testing jitters and that all is well.

I once read an article that encouraged teachers to call tests “Zimbabwes” because that word was silly and less threatening than the word “test”. Besides being kind of racist for calling the name of a country in Africa silly and implying that it isn’t threatening, this isn’t a particularly useful strategy for reducing anxiety since kids aren’t stupid. They know a test is a test no matter what you call it and for those kids who get performance anxiety or testing jitters, they need REAL strategies for focusing their minds and working with their anxiety.

There are also studies about how simply mentioning or implying that certain groups are not good at a subject (such as saying women aren’t good at math) prior to administering a test impacts performance in a measurable way. All of which to say is, testing anxiety is real and some kids need extra help. Tests are something we all have to suffer through even in the adult world (hello, DMV) so working on the anxiety as a child can help kids become successful, fully functioning adults.

In Testing Jitters Mya is nervous about a big test at school the next day. Her mom tries to soothe her and offers words of encouragement as well as to make a good breakfast in the morning, but she still goes to bed worried. In her dreams that night she is met by Gina, a genie. Together the two girls talk about things that bring Mya joy. They dance, swing, and visit the beach. Gina teaches Mya that she can calm herself by thinking of her favorite activities and places as well as taking deep breaths and believing in herself. She wakes up refreshed and takes her mom up on a hearty breakfast.

This is definitely a book for school libraries as well as classroom collections that teachers can pull out for working with anxious kiddos. Parents can work with kids to develop a list of strategies to try out for calming nerves- deep breaths, talking back to the anxious voice, finding some favorite places to visit to center themselves, etc. It’s helpful to see Mya do these things and find comfort in them as she sits down to take her big test. Testing anxiety (and honestly anxiety in general) is not a topic I see tackled a whole lot in kidlit, so Testing Jitters is a great addition to book shelves.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links)

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

Picture Book Review: Landon’s Lemonade Stand by Randy Williams

Landon’s Lemonade Stand written by Randy Williams, illustrated by Mark “mas” Stewart

Image description: In the center foreground, a little boy with short dreadlocks holds up a red cup of lemonade in one hand and flyer advertising his lemonade stand in the other. Behind him is a shiny, red, new bike and a table with a sign for his lemonade stand. Across the top is the title of the book with lemons on either side in the corners.

From Goodreads: Landon’s Lemonade Stand is about a young African American child who learns to be an entrepreneur by opening a lemonade stand to earn money for a brand new RBG Speedster bicycle. Author Randy Williams inspires young girls and boys alike with messages of leadership and financial responsibility while encouraging children to seek entrepreneurship at a young age.

Watching TV one morning Landon sees an ad for a new bike and decides he really, really wants it. His parents see an opportunity to have Landon take on the responsibility of getting what he wants for himself and suggest a lemonade stand. From there they support him through the process of getting it up and running and teaching him some basic business practices.

The pacing in this story was excellent. It starts with Landon seeing the bike on TV and has him run to his parents asking for it. Then the story takes us through the steps for getting his lemonade stand up and running and then shows resolution of his initial desire to get a bike. Nothing in the story drags, feels overly expository, or gets bogged down with too much detail. Williams keeps reader interest through the whole story while also giving them a blueprint for how to start up their own lemonade stand.

As a mom, I have to say I love the expressions on Landon’s mom’s face. Especially when they’re in the grocery store getting supplies. She’s making hard eye contact and raising an eyebrow. Landon is busy assuring her he has a good grip on what he needs and a complete list of supplies and she’s just being doubly sure, because she will not be driving back for forgotten items, so help her God. All the illustrations have a fun comic book style that matches the enthusiasm and lightness of the story.

With warmer weather heading our way in the Northern Hemisphere, this is sure to inspire kids to get out there and make lemonade. Libraries should have this book on their shelves during summer months to encourage all young entrepreneurs out there. Schools with summer programs and access to their libraries should definitely have this and even if the library is closed over the summer have it to inspire kids in April and May.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

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Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.